Recommended Interesting Articles

Reviews

Commonly Confused Words Fir and Fur

The words fir and fur are homophones: they sound alike but have different meanings. The noun fir refers to an evergreen tree with needle-shaped leaves. The noun fur refers to the soft, hairy coat of an animal or to a garment made of fur. Examples "In an area where spruce and fir mingle with quaking aspen, in a cool shady well-watered place, I discover a blue columbine, rarest and loveliest of mountain flowers.
Read More
Life

Manhattan College GPA, SAT and ACT Data

01 Of 02 Manhattan College GPA, SAT and ACT Graph Manhattan College GPA, SAT Scores and ACT Scores for Admission. Data courtesy of Cappex. How Do You Measure Up at Manhattan College? Calculate Your Chances of Getting In with this free tool from Cappex. Discussion of Manhattan College's Admissions Standards: Manhattan College has selective admissions, and roughly one out of every three applicants will receive a rejection letter.
Read More
Life

5 Reasons to Attend Private High School

Not everyone considers attending private school. The truth is, the private school vs. public school debate is a popular one. You might not think private school is worth a second look, especially if the public schools in your area are pretty good, the teachers are qualified, and the high school seems to get lots of graduates into good colleges and universities.
Read More
Advices

Why Get an Economics Ph.D?

I've been getting quite a few e-mails lately from people asking me if they should consider doing a Ph.D. in Economics. I wish I could help these people more, but without knowing more about them, I'm not at all comfortable giving career advice. However, I can list a few types of people who should not do graduate work in economics: Types of People Who Have No Business in an Economics Ph.
Read More
New

French Number Expressions

There are several confusing pairs and difficult expressions related to French numbers. Floor System Differences The numbering system of the floors in a building may be difficult for American English speakers. American English British English Rez-de-chaussée First floor Ground floor Premier étage Second floor First floor Deuxième étage Third floor Second floor The meaning of premier changes depending on the preposition that precedes it.
Read More